Earwig Journal

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T.C.
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PostT.C. on 11/3/2016, 11:23 pm

This is the start of my journal on my pet earwigs. As I type this they currently are just in a glass jar... however I am doing some research as to what makes a good habitat, as well as what will be visible as well. Below is a picture of two of them!



Last edited by T.C. on 11/7/2016, 3:03 pm; edited 2 times in total
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PostT.C. on 11/6/2016, 2:32 pm

Several of the females have laid eggs and claimed a certain parts of the container as their territory. One of the females killed another one when it got too close to it's nest!

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PostT.C. on 11/8/2016, 12:58 pm

I have made some modifications to the jar Smile  I made it so i didn't have to take off the jar to feed them, and now all I have to do is screw off that top cap. Which is the top of a soda bottle. When they are disturbed they lef off a fowl smell.  Some of the females have made huge tunnels into the sand to hide her eggs and keep them away from the males and the Isopods. I have the isopods to help clean the left over food. They guard the tunnel entrance with the pinchers on the end of their body.









You can see there is two earwigs on the top leaf, one is a male the other is the female which you can tell because the males have a larger curve in them.



Still waiting on the eggs to hatch!


Last edited by T.C. on 2/3/2017, 5:02 pm; edited 3 times in total
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PostPraxibetelix on 11/15/2016, 4:43 pm

Why did you want to keep earwigs? That photo of the eggs is really interesting. I have to admit, this is a species that I do not understand, and frankly, find gross lol. We do not kill them, but we do put them out of the house if one is found. I do not even know what they eat!

Your jar enclosure is really smart.
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PostT.C. on 11/15/2016, 10:12 pm

@Praxibetelix wrote:Why did you want to keep earwigs? That photo of the eggs is really interesting. I have to admit, this is a species that I do not understand, and frankly, find gross lol. We do not kill them, but we do put them out of the house if one is found. I do not even know what they eat!

Your jar enclosure is really smart.

haha, actually they are super fun. They are also fairly active and all around interesting.
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PostT.C. on 11/21/2016, 2:41 pm

Update: A lot more of the females have laid eggs and can be seen when looking at the bottom of the container. A few other males and some of the males just hang out at the top of the sticks. Here is some pictures I took today.



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PostPraxibetelix on 11/23/2016, 3:33 pm

They are so weird! Those egg photos are really cool though, like something out of Dune.
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PostT.C. on 12/28/2016, 6:07 pm

UPDATE: Well, a few of the eggs have hatched and a few small baby earwigs run around now, but to small to get a picture. However I still am not able to put them in my new habitat yet becuase some of the adults still keep laying eggs in the sand and I do not want to kill there eggs in the process. However in the mean time I will build there new habitat.
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PostPraxibetelix on 12/28/2016, 7:53 pm

Would love to see pictures of the babies when they are big enough!
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PostT.C. on 1/10/2017, 5:54 pm

Here is a picture of an adult and three of it's nymphs. Not the best picture. She was getting pretty upset with the light so I took the shot and put it back.



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PostT.C. on 2/3/2017, 4:47 pm

UPDATE: 2/3/2017

Well It's been a while and many of those nymphs turned into adults. The container was getting a little crowded and dirty so i relocated them to a new one. Unfortunately I had to tear up their old container to get to them. A few had gone for second batches of eggs, so i had to put them in seperate tubes with their eggs. Also a few batches of nymphs were just sitting in the corner, so I had to put them in a small container by them selves as well, otherwise the other adults would eat them without having their parent to protect them. I will let them go with all the rest once the nymphs are large enough to protect themselves.









I put food through the entrance hole. I control humidity by using a syringe full of water and squirting it through the entrance hole which runs into the sand.

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PostSalmon on 2/3/2017, 8:47 pm

@Praxibetelix wrote:Why did you want to keep earwigs? That photo of the eggs is really interesting. I have to admit, this is a species that I do not understand, and frankly, find gross lol. We do not kill them, but we do put them out of the house if one is found. I do not even know what they eat!

Your jar enclosure is really smart.

I find earwigs fascinating. They're incredibly adaptable omnivores (eating everything from live prey to leaves and flowers) with advanced parental care and intriguing social behavior.

I used to think of them as cockroaches with pincers, but they're really so much more than that.
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PostT.C. on 2/5/2017, 10:35 am

They really are cool. I know lots of people think of them as pests, but they really are cool and interesting to watch. I think their parental care is the most amazing. I have seen some amazing things with these guys.
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PostT.C. on 2/8/2017, 4:21 pm

Well I successfully moved them all into the new habitat. I fed them which I managed to get a nice short clip of how mean they can be to each other. The adults are rather territorial.

Moving into new habitat



FOOD FIGHT

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